Surgical Repair

For a child with imperforate anus /anorectal malformation, Hirschsprung Diseasecloacal malformation or any other condition that prevents the body from safely eliminating stool, the immediate goal of surgery is to provide a way for the body to pass waste safely and reduce the risk of infection.

In some cases, a single reconstructive surgery can help restore a way for the body to pass waste; however, most complex malformations often times will require a series of surgeries, performed over several months or years, to help normalize bowel function.  Depending on the severity of the condition, surgeries can be done within the first few days or weeks of a baby’s life, or can be delayed for several months if necessary.

Most of the procedures at the Center for Colorectal and Pelvic Reconstruction are done using laparoscopic or “minimally invasive” surgery. With this technique, surgeons don’t have to make large cuts in the body. Instead, the surgeon will make a few tiny cuts in the abdomen, and use specialized cameras and tools to conduct the surgery. Laparoscopy can help reduce pain, healing time and the risk of infection.  It is the preferred method of surgery for repairing anorectal malformations and Hirschsprung disease.

Here are a few of the surgical procedures that our team regularly performs for the treatment of Hirschsprung disease, imperforate anus/anorectal malformation, cloacal malformation and other colorectal conditions.

Anorectal Malformations (ARM)

Anorectal reconstructions

In some cases, a single reconstructive surgery can help restore a way for the body to pass waste; however, most complex malformations will require a series of surgeries, performed over several months, to help normalize bowel function.

Hirschsprung Disease

Posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP)/Pull-through

Posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP), also known as a “pull-through procedure,’ is a surgical technique used by our surgeons to correct a variety of anorectal and cloacal malformations.

Other Procedures

Appendicostomy or Malone Procedure

An appendicostomy (said like: a pen di KOSS tuh me), or Malone, can be done for children who need an enema every day to stay free from stool accidents.

Cecostomy Tube

A cecostomy tube is also called a C-tube. It is a non-latex tube or catheter placed in the first part of the large intestine, also called the cecum. A procedure called an irrigation is done to provide a comfortable, convenient way to clean out the bowel.

Colostomy

A colostomy is a surgical procedure performed on children who are unable to pass feces safely due to disease or anatomical defect.

Ileostomy

An ileostomy is a procedure that connects a part of the small intestine to a surgical hole (stoma) in the abdomen and perts feces to a special pouch outside the body.

PSARVUP

An operation called PSARVUP (posterior sagittal anorectal vaginal urethralplasty) can correct cloacal malformation.

Rectal Prolapse

Rectal prolapse is a protrusion of rectal wall tissue through the anus.

Urinary Tract Reconstruction

There are several conditions that require urinary tract reconstruction.