Conditions We Treat

Labial Adhesions

Labial adhesions, or labial agglutination, occur when the labia minor (inner lips of the vulva) are stuck together, covering the vaginal opening. The vast majority of girls with labial adhesions have no symptoms and do not require treatment as the adhesions will resolve on their own.

Learn More
Labial Hypertrophy

Larger-appearing labia minora, known as labial hypertrophy, may be completely normal. Labia vary in appearance with a wide range of normal regarding the size, shape and color. The majority of patients who have concerns about labial hypertrophy have normal labia.

Learn More
Lacerations (Cuts) Without Stitches in Children

A laceration is a tear or opening in the skin caused by an injury. Some lacerations are small and need only minor treatment at home.

Learn More
Lacerations With Stitches

Stitches, also called sutures, are special types of thread that hold the edges of a wound together while it heals.

Learn More
Lactose Intolerance in Children

Lactose intolerance is when the body can’t easily break down or digest lactose. Lactose is a sugar found in milk and milk products.

Learn More
Langerhan Cell Histiocytosis (LCH)

Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) is among a rare and diverse group of disorders affecting primarily children. LCH was previously known as Histiocytosis-X, with the terms eosinophilic granuloma, Hand-Schuller-Christian disease, and Letterer-Siwe disease applied to various forms of the disease.

Learn More
Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in Children

Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disorder that causes damage to tissues all over the body.

Learn More
Language Disorders in Children

A language disorder in a child means they have trouble understanding words that they hear and read. Or the child has trouble speaking with others and expressing thoughts and feelings.

Learn More
Large Cell Lymphoma

Learn More
Large for Gestational Age

Large for gestational age is used to describe newborn babies who weigh more than the usual amount for the number of weeks of pregnancy. Babies are called large for gestational age if they weigh more than 9 in 10 babies of the same gestational age.

Learn More
Laryngomalacia

Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of noisy breathing in infants. More than half of infants have noisy breathing during the first week of life, and most develop this by 2-4 weeks of age. Rarely, laryngomalacia occurs in older children, or adults, particularly those with other medical problems.

Learn More
Laryngomalacia (Laryngeal Stridor)

Laryngomalacia, also called laryngeal stridor, results from a weakness of parts of the voice box (larynx). The main symptom of laryngomalacia is noisy breathing when your child breathes in.

Learn More
Latent Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI)

Tuberculosis, or TB, is the common name for a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. People with latent TB infection (LTBI) do not feel sick. They do not have any symptoms but can potentially develop active TB disease. People with LTBI are not contagious and cannot spread TB to others.

Learn More
Lateral Malleolus Avulsion Fractures

Avulsion fractures are breaks or splits in the bone.

Learn More
Lead Poisoning in Children

Lead poisoning is a totally preventable disease. Children ages 1 to 3 who live in low-income housing built before 1978 are especially at risk. Read on to learn more.

Learn More
Learning Disorders in Children

A learning disorder is when a child has trouble learning in certain school subjects. Your child may have problems with reading, math, or writing. Here's what you need to know, and how to help.

Learn More
Legg Calve Perthes Disease

Legg Calve Perthes Disease, also known as Perthes or LCP, is a condition affecting one or both hips typically in children ages 3 to 10 years old

Learn More
Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease

Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, often called Perthes disease, is an uncommon condition in children affecting the hip. Perthes disease occurs when blood flow to the ball at the top of the thigh bone (femur) temporarily stops. If the growing bone does not get enough blood, it dies and collapses.

Learn More
Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease

This disease is a temporary condition that causes the hip joint to become painful and stiff.

Learn More
Leukemia

Leukemia is the most common form of childhood cancer. Leukemia is a cancer of the bone marrow, which is the tissue found inside many of the bones of the body. There are two main types of childhood leukemia: acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Learn More
Leukemia (ALL and AML)

Leukemia (ALL and AML) is the most common form of childhood cancer. It affects the tissues of the body which make the blood cells and the bone marrow. When leukemia strikes, the body makes an abundance of abnormal white cells that invade the marrow and crowd out the normal healthy blood cells.

Learn More
Leukemia in Children

Leukemia is cancer of the blood. It’s the most common form of cancer in childhood. The cancer cells grow in bone marrow and go into the blood.

Learn More
Lichen Planus

Lichen planus is a common rash that appears on the skin as shiny, flat bumps. The bumps may be clustered together in patches or scattered far apart. These bumps can occur anywhere on the body but are most often found on the legs and wrists. They can be red or purple in color. The rash may be itchy.

Learn More
Lichen Sclerosus (LS)

Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory, vulvar skin condition affecting young girls prior to puberty, as well as older, menopausal women. It is not clear how many patients experience LS or what causes it, but it may be an autoimmune condition.

Learn More
Lichen Striatus

Lichen striatus is a rash that appears as pink or lightly-colored, scaly, flat bumps. Over time, these bumps come together to form a line or band on the skin.

Learn More
Limb Length Discrepancy (LLD)

A limb length discrepancy (LLD) is when one arm or leg is longer than the other arm or leg. Leg length discrepancies are very common. There are two main causes of leg length discrepancy: a condition that caused one leg to grow slower or something like an injury affected the growth of the bone.

Learn More
Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

Limb-Girdle muscular dystrophy affects males and females. Most commonly it causes progressive hip and shoulder muscle weakness that spreads to the arms, legs and back. Symptoms usually begin between ages 8 and 15 and progress slowly. Patients usually become confined to a wheelchair by age 30.

Learn More
Listeriosis

You've probably been warned not to eat brie cheese or order your steak cooked to anything less than medium. Why do you have to take these precautions? Listeriosis. Learn more about this food-borne illness and how to avoid it.

Learn More
Little League Elbow

Little league elbow is a painful inflammation of the bony bump on the inside of the elbow where the tendons of the muscles that bend your wrist and fingers are located. Little league elbow occurs as a result of overuse to the muscles of the elbow and forearm from activities such as throwing a ball.

Learn More
Little Leaguer's Elbow

Little leaguer’s elbow is an injury to the medial epicondylar growth plate of the inner elbow. The growth plate is a weak area. Injury to it occurs due to repeated stress.

Learn More
Liver Disease

Liver disease occurs in children for a variety of reasons. Babies may have problems with inherited disease, despite having healthy parents. Congenital problems where the bile ducts don’t develop normally may also cause problems in babies. Infections may also lead to the development of liver disease.

Learn More
Liver Disorders

Detailed information on the most common liver disorders in children

Learn More
Liver Failure in Children

Liver failure happens when the liver becomes so sick and damaged that it stops working, either partly or completely. Although this is rare, liver failure can happen even in children. Many of them recover well, but others become extremely ill, and some may need a liver transplant to survive.

Learn More
Liver Transplant for Children

A liver transplant is surgery to replace a diseased liver with a healthy liver from another person.

Learn More
Living with Aplastic Anemia

Aplastic anemia is a rare blood disorder that most often occurs in children, teens, and young adults. This piece offers helpful information on how to help your child live with this disease.

Learn More
Living With Congenital Heart Disease

Detailed information for children living with a congenital heart disease

Learn More
Lordosis

Lordosis is the natural curve of the lower back (lumbar) area of the spine. There are five primary types of lordosis: postural lordosis, congenital/traumatic lordosis, post-surgical laminectomy hyperlordosis, neuromuscular lordosis and lordosis secondary to hip flexion contracture.

Learn More
Lordosis in Children

Lordosis is a deformity of the backbone (spine). It's when the bones of the spine (vertebrae) in the lower back curve inward more than normal.

Learn More
Low Back Strain

A low back strain is a stretch or tear of a muscle in the lower back that hold the vertebrae in its proper place. A low back strain can occur from lifting heavy objects, sitting or standing for long periods of time or a direct blow to the area.

Learn More
Low Birth Weight

Low birth weight is a term used to describe babies who are born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams). An average newborn usually weighs about 8 pounds. A low-birth-weight baby may be healthy even though he or she is small. But a low-birth-weight baby can also have many serious health problems.

Learn More
Low Milk Production

Detailed information on breastfeeding and low breastmilk production.

Learn More
Lower Respiratory Disorders

Detailed information on lower respiratory disorders in children

Learn More
Lower Urinary Tract Outlet Obstruction (LUTO)

Lower urinary tract outlet obstruction is when pee is partly or completely blocked from leaving the body at the lower urinary tract. LUTO occurs in about 1 in every 5,000 pregnancies. It is more common in males.

Learn More
Low-Grade Gliomas

Low-grade gliomas are a type of tumor that form in the brain or spinal cord (central nervous system) because of abnormal growth of glial cells. Glial cells surround, protect and help neurons, the cells that send messages from your brain to the rest of your body. work properly.

Learn More
Lung Transplantation in Children

A detailed look at lung transplantation in children, including why it is advised, information about the surgery, and the long-term outlook for a child after a lung transplant.

Learn More
Lupus and Pregnancy

Many women with lupus give birth to healthy children. The key to a successful pregnancy is know how lupus affects your body.

Learn More
Lying and Stealing

Lying and stealing are common, but inappropriate, behaviors in school-aged children. Most of the time these behaviors will be outgrown.

Learn More
Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. Symptoms of Lyme disease include fever, swollen lymph nodes, headache, stiff neck, tiredness, swelling of large joints and red rash that often has a “bulls-eye” appearance.

Learn More
Lyme Disease in Children

Lyme disease is an infection caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi. The bacteria are usually spread by tick bites. Lyme disease is a year-round problem, but it peaks during the spring and summer months.

Learn More
Lymphadenopathy in Children

Lymphadenopathy means swelling of the lymph nodes or glands. Lymphadenopathy can occur in just one area of the body, such as the neck. Or it may affect lymph nodes throughout the body. The cervical lymph nodes, found in the neck, are the most common site of lymphadenopathy.

Learn More
Lymphatic Disorders

Lymphatic disorders arise when the lymphatic system is disrupted either through congenital malformation, traumatic injury from a medical procedure, or a change in the lymphatic-circulatory balance. Lymphatic disorders may result in losses in nutritional, immune, electrolyte and clotting factors.

Learn More
Lymphatic Malformation

A lymphatic malformation is the result of abnormal formation and development during fetal development of the otherwise normal lymphatic vessels in the body. This is usually in one area of the body: neck, chest, abdomen and extremities.

Learn More
Lymphatic Malformations in Children

A lymphatic malformation is a lymphatic vessel that isn't formed correctly. The vessel traps the lymph fluid and causes cysts to form. Your child may have 1 or more of these cysts.

Learn More
Lymphatic Masses

Detailed information on lymphatic masses in children

Learn More
Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

Learn More
Lymphoma

Lymphoma is cancer which arises in the lymph system, the body’s circulatory network for filtering out impurities. There are two broad varieties, Hodgkin’s disease, and Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Learn More
Lynch Syndrome / HNPCC

Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is an inherited cancer syndrome that affects the digestive tract, reproductive tract and other major organs. It is the most common of the digestive cancer risk syndromes.

Learn More
Helping Hands Patient Education Materials

Written and illustrated by medical, nursing and allied health professionals at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Helping Hand instructions are intended as a supplement to verbal instructions provided by a medical professional. The information is periodically reviewed and revised to reflect our current practice. However, Nationwide Children's Hospital is not responsible for any consequences resulting from the use or misuse of the information in the Helping Hands.