Conditions We Treat

Browse Conditions A-Z

Labial Adhesions

Labial adhesions, or labial agglutination, occur when the labia minor (inner lips of the vulva) are stuck together, covering the vaginal opening. The vast majority of girls with labial adhesions have no symptoms and do not require treatment as the adhesions will resolve on their own.

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Labial Hypertrophy

Larger-appearing labia minora, known as labial hypertrophy, may be completely normal. Labia vary in appearance with a wide range of normal regarding the size, shape and color. The majority of patients who have concerns about labial hypertrophy have normal labia.

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Lacerations (Cuts) Without Stitches

A laceration is a tear or opening in the skin caused by an injury. Some lacerations are small and need only minor treatment at home.

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Lacerations With Stitches

Stitches, also called sutures, are special types of thread that hold the edges of a wound together while it heals.

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Lactose Intolerance in Children

Lactose intolerance is when the body can’t easily break down or digest lactose. Lactose is a sugar found in milk and milk products.

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Langerhan Cell Histiocytosis (LCH)

Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) is among a rare and diverse group of disorders affecting primarily children. LCH was previously known as Histiocytosis-X, with the terms eosinophilic granuloma, Hand-Schuller-Christian disease, and Letterer-Siwe disease applied to various forms of the disease.

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Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in Children

Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disorder that causes damage to tissues all over the body.

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Language Disorders in Children

A language disorder in a child means he or she has trouble understanding words that he or she hears and reads. Or the child has trouble speaking with others and expressing thoughts and feelings.

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Large Cell Lymphoma

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Large for Gestational Age

Large for gestational age is used to describe newborn babies who weigh more than the usual amount for the number of weeks of pregnancy. Babies are called large for gestational age if they weigh more than 9 in 10 babies of the same gestational age.

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Laryngomalacia

Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of noisy breathing in infants. More than half of infants have noisy breathing during the first week of life, and most develop this by 2-4 weeks of age. Rarely, laryngomalacia occurs in older children, or adults, particularly those with other medical problems.

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Laryngomalacia (Laryngeal Stridor)

Laryngomalacia, also called laryngeal stridor, results from a weakness of parts of the voice box (larynx). The main symptom of laryngomalacia is noisy breathing when your child breathes in.

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Helping Hands Patient Education Materials

Written and illustrated by medical, nursing and allied health professionals at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Helping Hand instructions are intended as a supplement to verbal instructions provided by a medical professional. The information is periodically reviewed and revised to reflect our current practice. However, Nationwide Children's Hospital is not responsible for any consequences resulting from the use or misuse of the information in the Helping Hands.