Conditions We Treat

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is an injury of the Achilles tendon (back of ankle). This tendon, sometimes called the ‘heel cord’, attaches the calf muscle to the heel. It is important for standing on your toes or for push-off during walking, running or jumping.

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Ankle Sprain

An ankle sprain is a torn or stretched ligament in the ankle. Signs of an ankle injury include pain, swelling and tenderness in the ankle that may spread to the whole ankle and foot, and trouble walking.

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Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tear

An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a sprain of one of the four major ligaments of the knee. The ACL is a rope-like structure that helps maintain the normal position of the femur (thigh bone) and the tibia (leg bone).

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Avulsion Fracture of the Iliac Crest

Avulsion fractures occur when a small piece of bone is separated from the main bone due to the pull of the muscle and tendon attached to it.

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Avulsion Fractures of the Ischial Tuberosity of the Pelvis

Avulsion fractures occur when a small piece of bone is separated from the main bone due to the pull of the muscle and tendon attached to it. This typically occurs in a growing bone which is weaker than a developed bone.

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Back Sciatica

The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in the body. It runs from the lower back through the hips and down each leg. The sciatic nerve provides sensation and muscle innervation to the back of the thigh, lower leg, ankle and foot.

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Biceps Tendonitis and Tenosynovitis (Distal)

Distal biceps tendonitis is pain at the front of the elbow and upper arm caused by inflammation (swelling) of the biceps tendon. Tenosynovitis (ten-oh-sine-oh-VIE-tis) is inflammation of the tendon sheath (lining) that surrounds the biceps tendon.

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Cradle Cap

Seborrheic dermatitis, also known as cradle cap, is very common in infants and children. It appears as scaly, itchy, white, yellow or red patches. It most often appears on the scalp but can also be found on the face, ears, or in body folds such as under the arms and behind the knees.

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Elbow Dislocation

The elbow joint is made up of 3 bones – 1 upper arm bone (humerus) and 2 forearm bones (ulna and radius). An elbow dislocation is an injury to the elbow joint that causes the humerus and ulna to be moved from their normal spot, so they no longer fit together. 

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Femoral Anteversion

Femoral anteversion (feh-mr-uhl an-ti-vur-zhn) is an inward turn of the thigh bone (femur) which can cause the knees and toes to point in (pigeon toed). Femoral anteversion can be seen in one or both legs. It is often most clear when children are 5 to 6 years old.

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Greater Trochanter Bursitis

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac, like a water balloon. It reduces rubbing between the bone and the surrounding soft tissue, like muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Bursitis occurs when there is swelling and pain in a bursa.

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Growth Plate Injuries

The physis, or growth plate, is an area of growing bone near the ends of long bones. Bones grow longer from the tissue produced by the physis and then harden.

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Helping Hands Patient Education Materials

Written and illustrated by medical, nursing and allied health professionals at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Helping Hand instructions are intended as a supplement to verbal instructions provided by a medical professional. The information is periodically reviewed and revised to reflect our current practice. However, Nationwide Children's Hospital is not responsible for any consequences resulting from the use or misuse of the information in the Helping Hands.