Conditions We Treat

Graves' Disease

Graves’ disease is the most common kind of hyperthyroidism. It happens when a person’s immune system acts against his or her thyroid gland by mistake. It makes too much of the hormone thyroxine. Graves’ disease can happen at any age in both males and females. It is more common in women.

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Graves Disease in a Newborn (Neonatal Graves Disease)

Graves disease is an autoimmune disease. The immune system normally protects the body from germs with chemicals called antibodies. But with an autoimmune disease, it makes antibodies that attack the body’s own tissues. With Graves disease, antibodies cause the thyroid gland to make too much thyroid hormone. This is known as hyperthyroidism. Extra thyroid hormone in the bloodstream leads to the body's metabolism being too active.

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Graves Disease in a Newborn (Neonatal Graves Disease)

Graves disease is an autoimmune disease. The immune system normally protects the body from germs with chemicals called antibodies. But with an autoimmune disease, it makes antibodies that attack the body’s own tissues. With Graves disease, antibodies cause the thyroid gland to make too much thyroid hormone. This is known as hyperthyroidism. Extra thyroid hormone in the bloodstream leads to the body's metabolism being too active.

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Graves Disease in Children

Graves disease is an autoimmune disease. With this disease, antibodies cause the thyroid gland to make too much thyroid hormone. This is known as hyperthyroidism. Excess thyroid hormone in the bloodstream leads to the body's metabolism being too active. It can cause problems such as weight loss, nervousness, fast heartbeat, tiredness, and other issues. It’s an ongoing (chronic) condition that needs lifelong treatment.

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Graves Disease in Pregnancy

Graves disease is a condition where the thyroid gland makes too much thyroid hormone. This is called hyperthyroidism or overactive thyroid. Graves disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism during pregnancy.

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Grief and Bereavement

The process of grieving is often long and painful for parents, siblings, relatives, friends, peers, teachers, neighbors, and anyone that understands the loss of a child.

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Group B Streptococcus Infection in Babies

Group B streptococcus (strep) is a type of bacteria. It can be found in the digestive tract, urinary tract, and genital area of adults. About 1 in 4 pregnant women carry GBS in their rectum or vagina. During pregnancy, the mother can pass the infection to the baby. The fetus can get GBS during pregnancy. Newborns can get it from the mother's genital tract during delivery.

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Growth and Development in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

Children with congenital heart disease often grow and develop more slowly than other children.

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Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is when the pituitary gland doesn't make enough growth hormone. GH is needed to stimulate growth of bone and other tissues. This condition can occur at any age. GH deficiency does not affect a child's intelligence.

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Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is when the pituitary gland doesn't make enough growth hormone. GH is needed to stimulate growth of bone and other tissues. This condition can occur at any age. GH deficiency does not affect a child's intelligence.

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Growth in Children

Detailed information on growth in children, including normal growth, newborn screening tests, growth problems, growth hormone deficiency and achondroplasia.

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Growth in Children

Detailed information on growth in children, including normal growth, newborn screening tests, growth problems, growth hormone deficiency, and achondroplasia

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Helping Hands Patient Education Materials

Written and illustrated by medical, nursing and allied health professionals at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Helping Hand instructions are intended as a supplement to verbal instructions provided by a medical professional. The information is periodically reviewed and revised to reflect our current practice. However, Nationwide Children's Hospital is not responsible for any consequences resulting from the use or misuse of the information in the Helping Hands.