Conditions We Treat

Femoral Anteversion

Femoral anteversion is a condition where the femur (thigh) bone rotates inward. This rotation causes the knee and foot to point inward as well. It is known as intoeing or being “pigeon-toed”. Often parents first notice this intoeing when their child begins to walk. It becomes most noticeable around 4 to 6 years of age. Femoral anteversion may exist in one or both legs.

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Femoral Anteversion in Children

Femoral anteversion is an inward twisting of the thighbone (femur). This health problem causes a child's knees and feet to turn inward. The child may have a pigeon-toed appearance.

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Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)

A baby born to a mother who drinks alcohol during pregnancy can have many problems. This is called fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).

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Fetal Blood Sampling

Fetal blood sampling is a procedure to take a small amount of blood from an unborn baby (fetus) during pregnancy. Fetal blood sampling is usually done by a perinatologist with special training. This is a doctor who specializes in the care of babies in high-risk pregnancies.

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Fetal Circulation

Through the blood vessels in the umbilical cord, the fetus receives all the necessary nutrition, oxygen, and life support from the mother through the placenta.

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Fetal Echocardiography

Fetal echocardiography (echo) uses sound waves to check the heart of your developing baby.

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Fetal Growth Restriction

Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a condition in which an unborn baby (fetus) is smaller than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy (gestational age). It is often described as an estimated weight less than the 10th percentile. This means that the baby weighs less than 9 out of 10 babies of the same gestational age. Newborn babies with FGR may be called "small for gestational age."

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Fetal Monitoring

In pregnancy and during labor, your healthcare provider will want to check the health of your unborn baby (fetus). This is done by checking the baby’s heart rate and other functions. Monitoring can be done on the outside of your belly (external monitoring). Or it may be done directly on the baby while inside your uterus (internal monitoring). Fetal monitoring is a very common procedure.

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Fetal Movement Counting

Fetal movement counting is a way to check the health of a woman’s unborn baby (fetus). It’s often called kick counting. It’s done by counting the number of kicks you feel from your baby in the womb in a certain time period.

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Fever

In this Helping Hand™, we discuss fever, which is an increase in the body’s temperature above the normal range. Most doctors agree that a temperature over 101° F is a fever. Fevers lower than 101° F don't need to be treated unless your child is uncomfortable or has a history of febrile seizures.

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Fever in A Newborn

The system that controls body temperature is not well developed in a newborn. Here's what you need to know about fever and your baby.

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Fever in Children

When your child has a fever, the body resets its thermostat at a higher temperature. This helps the body fight off invading microorganisms.

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Helping Hands Patient Education Materials

Written and illustrated by medical, nursing and allied health professionals at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Helping Hand instructions are intended as a supplement to verbal instructions provided by a medical professional. The information is periodically reviewed and revised to reflect our current practice. However, Nationwide Children's Hospital is not responsible for any consequences resulting from the use or misuse of the information in the Helping Hands.