Conditions We Treat

Browse Conditions A-Z

Polio (IPV)

The poliovirus destroys the nervous system, causing paralysis. Today, polio is extremely rare in the United States because of the polio vaccine. It's still common in other countries, though, so children still need to be immunized.

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Poliomyelitis (Polio) in Children

Polio is a very contagious disease caused by a virus. The virus is most known for causing paralysis. But very few children with polio develop paralysis. Read on to learn more about this condition in children.

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Pollen and Children

Detailed information on pollen allergy, also called hay fever, including information on which plants produce the most pollen and allergic rhinitis prevention during pollen season

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Polycystic Kidney Disease

Learn about the two different types of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

 

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Polycystic Kidney Disease

Detailed information on the different types of polycystic kidney disease

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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a common problem in women that begins in the teenage years. It is an imbalance of hormones (chemical messengers) in the brain and ovaries.

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Polycythemia Vera in Children

Polycythemia vera is a serious, but very rare blood disorder in children. With polycythemia vera, the bone marrow makes too many red blood cells. The extra cells make the blood too thick. This may lead to blood clots. The clots can decrease the blood supply to organs, tissues, and cells.

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Polydactyly

Polydactyly refers to extra fingers or toes that are present at birth. Polydactyly usually is genetic. These extra digits can be made up of one or more of the following: Skin, soft tissue and bone with joint, ligament, and tendon.

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Polyps

A polyp is an outgrowth of tissue that can extend out into the empty space within the stomach, small intestine, or colon. Polyps can generally be divided into two groups: hamartomas and adenomas.

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Positional Plagiocephaly (Flattened Head)

Positional plagiocephaly is a flat area on the back or on one side of your baby’s head that does not go away on its own.

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Post Concussion Syndrome

After a concussion, we expect that most children will return to typical functioning within 3-4 weeks. However, a small portion of children can experience symptoms that continue for a longer duration. This is called post-concussion syndrome (PCS).

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Posterior Pituitary Disorders

Detailed information on posterior pituitary disorders

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Helping Hands Patient Education Materials

Written and illustrated by medical, nursing and allied health professionals at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Helping Hand instructions are intended as a supplement to verbal instructions provided by a medical professional. The information is periodically reviewed and revised to reflect our current practice. However, Nationwide Children's Hospital is not responsible for any consequences resulting from the use or misuse of the information in the Helping Hands.