Diagnostic Procedures

The diagnostic capabilities of the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition are some of the most advanced in the world. The use of flexible probes, called endoscopes or colonoscopes, has facilitated the diagnosis of many GI diseases. Many other state-of-the-art instruments are being used to understand how the GI tract functions (how it moves and what it senses). The GI team also is utilizing the non-invasive capsule endoscope, in which the patient swallows a miniaturized camera – about the size of a large vitamin pill – that transmits images of the entire GI tract.

Anorectal Manometry (Anal Manometry)

Anorectal manometry is used to test for the normal relaxation of the muscles which help to control bowel movements.

Antroduodenal Manometry

Antroduodenal manometry is used to study how the stomach and the first part of the small intestine are working.

Breath Testing

Hydrogen breath testing is used to evaluate several different GI problems including intolerance of various sugars and overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine.

C-13 Urea for Helicobacter

One test that can be used to look for infection with H. pylori is a C-13 breath test, where your child is given a special drink and then will be asked to blow into a bag.

Capsule Endoscopy

Noninvasive capsule endoscopy allows for visualization of the lining of the small intestine in areas of the intestine which cannot be seen with standard endoscopy.

Colonic Manometry

Colonic manometry is used to study how the colon is working. A catheter is placed in the colon and attached to a computer that records the strength and coordination of muscle contractions in the colon.

Colonic Marker Study

A child may have constipation if his or her stools are too hard, too infrequent, too painful, too large or if he cannot push it all out. Constipation is a symptom, not a disease. It can be caused by many different things.

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a test that allows the doctor to look directly at the lining of the large intestine (colon) using a long flexible tube that has a light and video chip at the end (colonoscope).

Contrast Enema

A contrast enema is a test where contrast solution makes the large intestine (bowel) and part of the small intestine show up on the X-ray picture.

Esophageal Manometry

Esophageal manometry is used to study how the esophagus (swallowing tube) is working. A small tube (catheter) is passed through the nose and into the esophagus. 

Feeding Tube Education

Learn how to properly handle your child's feeding tube, from changing and replacing to feeding and giving medicine.

Gastrointestinal Test (Upper GI Series)

An upper GI series is a test that is done to see how the stomach fills and empties into the small bowel. The test uses an X-ray to look for things that are not normal in the upper GI tract.

Impedance pH Monitoring

Impedance pH Monitoring measures the length of time it takes for your child’s stomach contents (acid or non-acid) come back up into his or her esophagus.

Pancreatic Function Testing (not ERCP)

Sometimes it is important to measure the amount of the enzymes that gets into the small intestine. This is done at the time of an upper endoscopy.

pH Probe Impedance

These tests are used to measure how often material refluxes from the stomach back into the esophagus (gastroesophageal reflux).

Proctoscopy

A proctoscopy is a test that allows the doctor to look directly at the lining of the rectum using a flexible tube that has a light and video chip at the end.

Sigmoidoscopy

A sigmoidoscopy is a test that allows the doctor to look directly at the lining of the lower end of the large intestine using a flexible tube that has a light and video chip at the end.

Upper Endoscopy

An upper endoscopy is a test that allows your child’s doctor to examine the lining of the esophagus (swallowing tube), stomach, and duodenum (first part of the small intestine).

Upper Endoscopy with General Anesthesia

An upper endoscopy is a test done to examine the lining of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The doctor will look for signs of redness, swelling, bleeding, ulcers or infections. Small tissue samples (biopsies)will be collected to be studied under a microscope.