BC4Teens Parent Resources

Mom Talking to Her Teenage Daughter

Every day, teens are faced with decisions. Decisions about school, decisions about friends, even decisions about sex.

Parents play a key role in educating children and providing support to prevent unplanned teen pregnancies.

Check out a few of the frequently asked questions we receive from parents.

How can I help my teen make good decisions about practicing safe sex and birth control?

The BC4Teens Program is a place where young women and parents can comfortably talk with our medical team about issues that can be difficult: Sex, birth control, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and more. Offering a full range of contraceptive counseling, BC4Teens has the newest and longest-lasting forms of birth control. And your teen can get the one that’s best for her – during her appointment.

How can I talk to my teen about sex and birth control?

As children grow, they will come to you to discuss awkward topics such as sex or using birth control. The “talk” that many parents dread does not have to be awful! It should be a series of conversations that can start in early childhood while discussing body parts and their functions, hygiene, and bodily changes during puberty.

If the child has knowledge about how our bodies work, about healthy relationships and the realities of being a teen, the discussion will be much more open and honest: and less difficult. We know these conversations can be uncomfortable for everyone, and while teens may act like they don’t want to hear what you have to say, they take in a lot more than we think. Share your morals and values around sexual activity and make sure to give them the facts in a non-judgmental fashion.

Read tips for talking to your teen about birth control.

Why should I talk to my teen about birth control?

From a young age it is important to let kids know you are available to talk about their feelings and answer questions. In the United States, 71 percent of teens have engaged in sexual activity by 19 years of age.Teaching teens about birth control is not giving them permission to engage in sexual activity. It is preparing them to protect themselves against unplanned pregnancy and STIs.

Does my teen need to be sexually active to be on birth control?

Many teens who use birth control are not sexually active and do not plan to be sexually active. Whether she’s thinking ahead, has recently begun a relationship or has a medical reason such as heavy periods, cramping or acne, choosing a birth control method is a responsible decision.

If your teen seems curious about birth control, have an open, honest and judgement-free discussion. Answer her questions and provide support. Understand that she may be not be engaging in risky behavior, but instead is attempting to make mature, informed decisions for her future.

Which birth control method is right for my teen?

Many different kinds of birth control are safe and effective for teens. Methods like the contraceptive implant and IUD that can last for years at a time, are more than 99% effective and are completely reversible.Talk to Nationwide Children’s experts to learn about the different options and which form might be best for your teen.

Learn about the birth control methods available here.

Is there a birth control my daughter doesn’t have to remember to take every day?

Yes! There are other methods like the contraceptive implant that lasts for 3 years or IUDs which can last from 3 to 10 years depending on the type. The IUDs and implant are called low maintenance birth control, because even when we are forgetful, they are working for us.

Does birth control have long-term effects on my daughter’s health?

Research shows long-term (and even short term) birth control methods do not affect your future fertility.

Fertility varies from person to person. That’s why women who use the pill regularly but accidentally forget to take it for a few days can get pregnant that month. Women who have an IUD and have it removed can then get pregnant.

All birth control methods available at BC4Teens are completely reversible. They will not prevent your daughter’s ability to have children in the future.

Learn more about the different birth control types and side effects.

Can I afford birth control?

Preventive services, like birth control, are available for most of our patients at no cost to the patient. We also accept most insurance and Medicaid.

Visit our Billing FAQ page for more information.

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