Columbus Children's Hospital Childhood Obesity Expert Recommends Simple Intervention To Prevent School- Age Children From Becoming Overweight Adults

October 20, 2002

With one in four children at risk for becoming overweight and one in 10 children already overweight, simple interventions that will have more kids standing in line at their school cafeterias and more pediatricians weighing in on the subject could be the answer, according to a childhood obesity expert from Columbus Children's Hospital. Robert Murray, M.D., F.A.A.P., director of the Center for Nutrition and Wellness at Columbus Children's Hospital, proposes that to combat childhood obesity, greater emphasis should be placed on school-based nutrition policies as well as weight management and nutrition counseling during the recommended 12 well-child visits with the child's pediatrician. Dr. Murray discussed these strategies and others Sunday, October 20 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Boston.

Dr. Murray suggests using the 12 well-child visits between birth and age 5 to treat obesity with the same level of seriousness and aggressiveness used when promoting child immunizations. Typically during the visits, physicians will monitor a child's progress on the body mass index (BMI) curve by reviewing dietary habits and basic nutrition with parents. Dr. Murray said keeping children on the BMI curve will prevent the vast majority of adulthood obesity.

Secondly, Dr. Murray recommends developing school-based nutrition policies to maintain a reasonable weight for every child into their adolescent years. According to Dr. Murray, the cost of providing a universal breakfast and lunch through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is minimal compared to the cost of treating the obesity epidemic. Research indicates the positive impact of breakfast and lunch on the academic performance of students. Through the NSLP, children consume twice the servings of fruits and vegetables and greater amounts of grains and dairy.

"Obesity is a pediatric disorder," Dr. Murray said. "The obese child at age 6 has a 50 percent chance of obesity as an adult, while an obese child at age 10 has a 70-80 percent chance of becoming an overweight adult. We need to optimize interventions that are effective and influence children early in life to prevent obesity in adults."

Dr. Murray said interventions with children at school and at home will decrease obesity, improve fitness, prevent health problems and achieve Healthy People 2010 goals. Healthy People 2010 is a United States Department of Health and Human Services program that challenges individuals, communities, and professionals to take specific steps to ensure that good health is enjoyed by all.

Columbus Children's Hospital ranks among the top 10 in National Institutes of Health research awards and grants to freestanding children's hospitals in the country. With nearly 500,000 patient visits each year, Children's Hospital is a 110-year-old pediatric healthcare network treating newborns through age 21. In 2001, the Children's Research Institute conducted more than 105 research projects. Pediatric Clinical Trials International (PCTI), a site management organization affiliated with the hospital, also coordinated more than 50 clinical trials. In addition to having one of the largest ambulatory programs in the country, Children's offers specialty programs and services. Each year, more than 75,000 consumers receive health and wellness education and 2,000 students from 100 institutions and 500 residents receive training at Children's. More information on Children's Hospital of Columbus is available by calling (614) 722-KIDS (5437) or through the hospital's Web site at http://www.columbuschildrens.com.

About Nationwide Children's Hospital

Named to the Top 10 Honor Roll on U.S. News & World Report’s 2017-18 list of “America’s Best Children’s Hospitals,” Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of America’s largest not-for-profit freestanding pediatric healthcare systems providing wellness, preventive, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitative care for infants, children and adolescents, as well as adult patients with congenital disease. Nationwide Children’s has a staff of nearly 13,000 providing state-of-the-art pediatric care during more than 1.4 million patient visits annually. As home to the Department of Pediatrics of The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children’s physicians train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists. The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of the Top 10 National Institutes of Health-funded freestanding pediatric research facilities. More information is available at NationwideChildrens.org.