Jonathan L. Slaughter, MD, MPH

Nationwide Children's Hospital Medical Professional

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Biography

Jonathan L. Slaughter, MD, MPH, is a neonatologist and principal investigator in the Center for Perinatal Research within The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University. Dr. Slaughter's ultimate goal is to improve outcomes important to neonatal patients and their families through research that leads directly to improvements in neonatal clinical care. His patient-centered research program focuses on comparative effectiveness research to determine which treatments work best for neonatal patients given specific clinical circumstances and patient characteristics.

Academic and Clinical Areas
Awards, Honors & Organizations
  • Member, American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Member, Society for Pediatric Research
  • Member, International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology
Education

Date of Appointment at Nationwide Children’s Hospital: 07/19/2010

Board Certifications
  • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
  • Pediatrics
Fellowship Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Date Completed: 06/30/2010
Residency Medical University of South Carolina Date Completed: 06/30/2007
Medical School Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Date Completed: 05/17/2004
Undergraduate School Catawba College Date Completed: 12/31/2000
Professional Experience

2010 - Present Nationwide Children's Hospital/The Ohio State University, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

Research Funding
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, United States National Institutes of Health

Comparative Effectiveness of Diuretics and Inhaled Corticosteroids for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Preterm Infants (R03HL140272), Principal Investigator

The goal of this study: To utilize “real-world” data to determine whether diuretic and inhaled corticosteroid treatments for evolving and established BPD reduce mortality and severity of BPD in preterm infants at 36-weeks PMA, as compared to no treatment.

Contact Information
Pediatrics
Research