Center for Childhood Cancer :: The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital

Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program (PPTP)

World-Renowned Biopathology Center

Clinical Trials

At any given time there are a large number of clinical trials taking place at Nationwide Children’s that offer state-of-the-art therapies and additional treatment options to your child.

Learn more here »

Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases

The Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Disease's mission is to expand the understanding of the pathogenesis of childhood cancer and to improve strategies for diagnosis and treatment.

Areas of Focus

  • Biology and therapy of rhabdomyosarcoma and other childhood tumors

  • Chemotherapy of childhood solid tumors

  • Regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

  • Regulation and function of tumor suppressor genes

  • Oncolytic viral therapy in pediatric brain tumors

Affiliations and Collaborations

Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases News

How the Anti-Inflammatory Drug, Celebrex, May Treat and Prevent Cancer

Celebrex, a drug currently marketed for its anti-inflammatory properties, may have anti-tumor and cancer prevention effects, particularly because it blocks STAT3 signaling, suggests new research.

Read more :: How the Anti-Inflammatory Drug, Celebrex, May Treat and Prevent Cancer

Center for Childhood Cancer Featured in reSearch Magazine

Fast Tracking Children’s’ Cancer Drugs
Animal Models of Childhood Cancer Help Prioritize Adult Drugs for Children 

Modifying Measles
Virotherapy May Help Treat Childhood Brain Tumors

How Do You Talk About Cancer?
How do you tell a seven-year-old she has cancer? How do you tell the same to a 17-year-old? Answers aren’t entirely clear. 

Blocking Signaling Pathway to Kill Liver Cancer

Research from Nationwide Children’s is helping to clarify how the most severe form of liver cancer develops and also has identified a potential new compound for boosting the effectiveness of its current treatments. 

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a molecule originally characterized as important in immune and inflammatory responses to protect cells under very toxic conditions.  A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that overproduction of IL-6 contributes to various human diseases including autoimmune disease, chronic inflammatory disease and many types of human cancer such as liver cancer.

Read more :: Blocking Signaling Pathway to Kill Liver Cancer

It May Be Clinically Acceptable to Delay Growth Factor Treatment in Children Post-Chemotherapy

Treating children with growth factors as late as five days after they receive a bone marrow or blood stem cell transplant may result in substantial cost savings and still be as clinically beneficial as treating patients one day after transplantation. These findings are from a Nationwide Children’s Hospital study appearing in Pediatric Blood & Cancer, the first study to examine whether delayed administration in pediatrics affects engraftment time.

Read more :: It May Be Clinically Acceptable to Delay Growth Factor Treatment in Children Post-Chemotherapy

Modified Measles Virus Shows Potential for Treating Childhood Brain Tumors

The use of modified measles virus may represent a new treatment for a childhood brain tumor known as medulloblastoma, according to a new study appearing in Neuro-Oncology.  Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor of childhood, accounting for about 20 percent of pediatric brain tumors.

Quality of Life Plays Important but Neglected Role in Comparing Treatment for Severe Sickle Cell Disease

A study appearing in the Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology suggests that stem cell transplantation may provide severe sickle cell patients with the greatest quality of life, but more data is needed before a “gold standard” treatment can be identified.

Read more :: Quality of Life Plays Important but Neglected Role in Comparing Treatment for Severe Sickle Cell Disease

Combining Rapamycin with Chemotherapeutic Agents to Enhance Treatment of Childhood Cancer Appears Promising

Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant drug commonly used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation, has shown potential to inhibit tumor growth in many childhood cancers during in vitro and in vivo laboratory studies.

Nationwide Children's Hospital Selected as Biospecimen Core Resource for The Cancer Genome Atlas

Nationwide Children's Hospital
700 Children's Drive Columbus, Ohio 43205 614.722.2000