CCFA Sexual Abuse Education Tools :: Nationwide Children's Hospital

Sexual Abuse Education Tools

 

 

These tools from the Center for Family Safety and Healing can help your family understand and start the discussion about sexual abuse.

Suggested Reading List
Talking to your kids about abuse- what it is, how to prevent it and how to overcome trauma- can be very difficult. These books can help you approach the topic and guide you through the discussions.

Commonly Asked Questions
Caregivers are often worried about protecting their child from further harm after their child has disclosed sexual and/or physical abuse. Caregivers often question whether counseling would do more harm than good in their child’s situation. This handout is meant to address some of your concerns openly, and to explain why counseling is believed to be a critical piece in your child’s healing process.

Important Responses
Information on how to respond to a child abuse victim.and suggestions for caregivers of suspected child abuse victim.

 

True and False Quiz about Sexual Abuse

 

 

Test your knowledge about Sexual Abuse with the questions below. Read the question and then click on the (+) to read the answer.

 


 

 

 

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The correct answer is FALSE. Sexual abuse is any act of a sexual nature upon or with a child whether that child said “No” or not, and whether the child liked what happened or not. Many times children do not say “No” for a variety of reasons when they are being sexually abused. Some people are surprised by the idea that a child can be sexually abused and perhaps partly “like what happened.”  In the case of older children especially, who thought they had a boyfriend/girlfriend relationship with the alleged perpetrator, these children may not even perceive the relationship as being abusive at all. There are also situations where a child is to young to know that the sexual acts were inappropriate. Because all children are born into this world as sexual beings, the reality is that some sexual acts may feel good to the child’s body, and they may “like,” in that sense, what has happened to them.





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The correct answer is TRUE. Not all forms of sexual abuse “hurt” the body in regards to how the touch feels, although all forms of child sexual abuse are believed to be harmful. Once again, because all children are born into this world as sexual beings, the reality is that some sexual acts may feel good to the child’s body, and they may “like,” in that sense, what has happened to them.





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The correct answer is FALSE. Boys can be a victim of sexual abuse too. National statistics suggest that one in four girls will be sexually abused by their eighteenth birthday and one in six boys.         




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The correct answer is FALSE. Although males are more likely to be found to be the perpetrators of sexual abuse, females can be sexually abusive too.




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The correct answer is FALSE. The nature of sexual abuse is that a child becomes a victim of sexual abuse solely due to the actions of the sexual abuse perpetrator, who is the abuser. The child is not breaking the law by engaging in sexual acts with a sexual abuse perpetrator, the sexual abuser, however, is. In the case, especially of older children/adolescents, sexual abuse perpetrators will sometimes blame those children for being provocative and seeking to engage them in sexual acts. Our experience is that this is just an excuse used by the sexual abuser to justify their own illegal behavior.




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The correct answer is TRUE. The reality is that our children are more likely to be sexually abused by someone that knows them or someone that knows the adult caregivers. Almost 80% of sexual abuse is perpetrated on children by someone they or their caregivers know. Perpetrators do not share similar characteristics except in their choice to sexually abuse a child(ren). Sexual abuse perpetrators can be male or female, belong to any racial or ethnic group, come from rich or poor socioeconomic backgrounds, be employed or unemployed, young or old, etc.




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The correct answer is TRUE. Sexual abuse can also involve: an alleged perpetrator asking the child or making the child do things to their body and private parts; having the child engage in sexually exploitive activities including taking pictures of the child in sexualized poses or states of inappropriate dress or undress; an alleged perpetrator orchestrating the child to engage in sexual behaviors with other children; etcetera. Children should be taught that it is okay to tell their caregivers right away when someone touches them or treats them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable or causes them to feel that something is not “right.”  




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The correct answer is FALSE. Even in cases where a sexual abuse allegation has been substantiated, 95% of the time or more, there are no physical findings of sexual abuse. Fondling of private parts does not leave marks on the body, and even penetration, more often than not, does not leave physical findings that a medical professional who specializes in child abuse and/or sexual assaults can see upon physical exam. Sometimes victims of sexual abuse may contract from their sexual abuse perpetrator a sexually transmitted infection(s) or becomes pregnant. These physical findings may be the only indications that penetration has occurred, along with what the child and/or the sexual abuse perpetrator themselves have disclosed in regards to penetration.




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This is a trick question!  The correct answer can be TRUE or FALSE depending on the child. Some children, because they have a relationship with their sexual abuser that has been positive outside of the abuse, still love and like their abuser and want to continue a relationship with them; they just want the sexual abuse itself to stop. In the case of older children, especially those who thought of themselves as being romantically partnered with their abuser, it is not uncommon for them to want to continue to be around the sexual abuser. These children may believe that they are “in love” with that person, and that they have a romantic future together. Other children, especially those who have been harmed physically by their sexual abuse perpetrator, or who have been threatened by their sexual abuse perpetrator, may be scared of that person, and may display behaviors that suggest to others they do not want to be around that person. Each child is different, and just because a child is not acting the way you think they should act as a child sexual abuse victim, does not mean that the abuse did not occur.



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