Medical Professional Publications

Maternal Interactions May Affect Neurodevelopment of Infants with Heart Defects

Dr. Harrison expands her study on the effects of maternal interactions on autonomic function and neurodevelopment in infants with cognitive heart defects

Tondi Harrison, PhD, principal investigator in the Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, is continuing her research into effects of maternal interactions on autonomic function and neurodevelopment in infants with congenital heart defects. She recently expanded her study in collaboration with Dr. Jill Heathcock from OSU’s Division of Physical Therapy, adding measures of motor skills, learning, and memory. The expanded study will follow these infants from birth through three months of age and will compare outcomes with premature and healthy infants. More information about early development in these infants will help us identify problems and target interventions earlier than we are now able to do.

Related Publications:
Weber A, Harrison TM, StewardD. Schore’s regulation theory: Maternal-infant interaction in the NICU as a mechanism for reducing the effects of allostatic load on neurodevelopment in premature infants. Biological Research for Nursing, 14, 375-386. 2012.

Harrison TM, Brown  R. (2012). Autonomic nervous system function in infants with transposition. Biological Research for Nursing, 14, 257-268. PMCID: PMC3296865. 2012.

Harrison TM. Trajectories of parasympathetic nervous system function before, during, and after feeding in infants with transposition of the great arteries. Nursing Research, 60, S15-S27. PMCID: PMC3139514. 2011.

Contact: Tondi Harrison
Tondi.Harrison@NationwideChildrens.org

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