Medical Professional Publications

Innovation and Discovery

(From the February 2017 Issue of MedStat)

Visit NationwideChildrens.org/Research-News for additional information regarding these articles. More news from The Research Institute can be found at NationwideChildrens.org/Research-Now.

Local Learning Health System Model Demonstrates High-Quality Patient Care While Reducing Costs
Providing high-quality patient care while reducing costs is a significant goal in the current health care reform environment. A recent pilot study by a team from Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University has demonstrated that with the implementation of a “local” learning health system, clinical quality can be improved while simultaneously lowering health care costs. The study, published in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology with an editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Association, was led by William E. Smoyer, MD, vice president of Clinical and Translational Research and director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Nationwide Children’s.

Read the Pediatrics Nationwide article.

Researchers Find Universal Handheld Phone Ban May Reduce Drive-time Conversations
Distracted driving is a prevalent safety hazard for everyone, but especially for drivers in their first several years behind the wheel, with traffic crashes as the leading cause of death for young adults between 15 and 24 years of age. A new NIH-funded study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital shows that handheld phone bans for all drivers may be effective at reducing handheld phone use among young drivers. Motao Zhu, MD, MS, PhD, principal investigator in the center, is lead author of the research, which was published in Annals of Epidemiology.

Read the News Room article.

For AYA Females With Rhabdomyosarcoma, Consider Routine Examination or Imaging of Breasts
Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a soft tissue sarcoma associated with metastasis and inferior outcomes in adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients, or those with cancer diagnosis at age 15-39 years of age. Little data is available to guide the management of primary or metastatic breast RMS, particularly in the AYA population. A case series review recently published in the Journal of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology highlights the need for guidelines for follow-up imaging. The case review was conducted by Anthony Audino, MD, pediatric oncologist in Hematology/Oncology & Blood and Marrow Transplant, and his colleagues at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Read the Pediatrics Nationwide article.

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