Glossary - Feeding Tube Workbook :: Nationwide Children's Hospital

Glossary

Aspiration pneumonia: inflammation/infection of the lungs due to breathing  food, fluids, or other foreign materials into the lungs

Bolus tube feeding: feeding method in which formula is inserted into the feeding tube with a syringe at regular times

Cap: a cover that is attached to the medicine or formula port of the feeding tube that, when inserted into the port, keeps stomach contents from leaking out.  See also: plug

Clamp: a device that is attached to the feeding tube that can be used to pinch the feeding tube to keep stomach contents from leaking out

Constipation: bowel movements that do not happen very often or hard stools that are painful of difficult to pass

Continuous tube feeding: tube feeding where the formula is given via a pump at a continuous rate for a specified time period

Decompression: removing air or fluid from the stomach

Dehydration: condition in which the body does not have enough water

Diarrhea: frequent loose, watery bowel movements

Dysphagia: Difficulty swallowing

Electrolyte: a nutrient (such as sodium, potassium, or chloride) that helps regulate cell and organ function

Enteral (enteric): a feeding given into the stomach or intestine by tube

Esophagus: muscular tube leading from the mouth to the stomach

External Bumper: a device that rests against the skin and prevents the feeding tube from slipping into the stomach; See also: plastic disk

Farrell Bags: bag and tubing system that allows the release of gas from the stomach through a feeding tube

Feeding Bags: bag and tubing system that holds formula to be given through a feeding tube either by gravity or with a pump

Feeding tube: a tube into the stomach or small intestine through which formula is given

Formula: a liquid nutritional product that has the same nutrients as regular food

Foley: a type of feeding tube that goes into the stomach

Gastric: having to do with the stomach

Gastrostomy (G) tube: a feeding tube that goes into the stomach through a stoma, which may be placed surgically or endoscopically

GJ Tube: a type of feeding tube that goes into both the stomach and the small intestine

Gastrostomy site: the opening in the stomach where a feeding tube enters the body (also known as a stoma site).

Granulation tissue: extra tissue that grows around the stoma

Gravity drip feeding: feeding method in which formula enters a feeding tube from a container placed above the patient, providing nutrition without power, but by gravity

Jejunostomy (J) tube: a feeding tube that goes into the small intestine

Jejunum: the middle part of the small intestine located between the duodenum and ileum

Low profile feeding tube: examples of low profile feeding tubes: MIC-KEY Low-Profile Gastrostomy Feeding Tube; Bard Gastrostomy Button; Mini ONE Balloon Button

Nasogastric (NG) tube: a feeding tube that goes from the nose to the stomach

NPO: Nothing by mouth [Latin – non per os]

Nutrients: parts of food that nourish the body (protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water)

PEG (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy): one of the methods of placement for a gastrostomy tube

PEJ (percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy): one of the methods of placement for a jejunostomy tube

Plastic disk: a device that rests against the skin and prevents the feeding tube from slipping into the stomach; See also: external bumper

Plug: a cover that is attached to the medicine or formula port of the feeding tube that, when inserted into the port, keeps stomach contents from leaking out.  See also: cap

Pump: a machine used to control the flow of the tube feeding formula

Regurgitation: the backflow of contents from the gastrointestinal tract

Residual: formula from the last feeding that is still in the stomach at the next feeding

Small intestine: the part of the digestive tract between the stomach and large intestine that digests and absorbs nutrients

Stoma: Opening in the abdominal wall through which a gastrostomy tube or jejunostomy tube enters the body (also known as a gastrostomy site)

Stomach: Organ between the esophagus and small intestine that holds food during the early part of digestion

Syringe: A hollow, plastic tube with a plunger used to draw fluid out of or inject fluid into a feeding tube

Units of measure:

  • milliliter (ml) = cubic centimeter (cc)
  • 1 ml = 1 cc
  • 30 ml or cc = 1 ounce (oz.)
  • 240 ml or cc = 8 oz. = 1 standard measuring cup
  • 15 drops (in the plastic drip chamber connected to the tubing) = 1 ml = 1 cc

View and print the Feeding Tube Workbook

Nationwide Children's Hospital
700 Children's Drive Columbus, Ohio 43205 614.722.2000