Injury Research and Policy Announcements :: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

Center for Injury Research and Policy Announcements

The Center for Injury Research and Policy Announcements page provides information about recent awards, publications, studies and events as related to our Center.

2013 Announcements


Injury Research Faculty Position Available

The Center for Injury Research and Policy, located in The Research Institute of Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is seeking applicants for a tenure track faculty position.   [more...]

  • Faculty members have a tenure track appointment in the Department of Pediatrics of The Ohio State University College of Medicine.
  • Joint appointments in other departments and colleges within the university are easily arranged. 
  • Applicants should have a doctoral degree in the public health, medical, or related field, and a track record in research productivity. 
  • Applicants will be considered at the Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor levels.
  • Applications from mid-career researchers are encouraged. 
  • Salary and benefits are very competitive and are based on experience and academic rank.
  • An attractive startup package will be tailored to the faculty member’s needs.
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.


Candidates should apply by sending a letter of application and CV to:

Gary A. Smith, MD, DrPH
Professor of Pediatrics
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Director, Center for Injury Research and Policy
The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s
Columbus, Ohio 43205
Phone: (614) 355-5884
Fax: (614) 355-5897
Email: Gary.Smith@NationwideChildrens.org

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Dr. McKenzie Elected as SAVIR’s Chair of Council of Centers

Wednesday, April 17, 2013 Lara McKenzie, PhD and principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP), assumed duties today as the Chair of the Council of Centers for the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR). A member since 2007, Dr. McKenzie will also serve on SAVIR’s board of directors.   [more...]

Since joining CIRP in 2005, Dr. McKenzie’s research has focused on increasing adoption of parent safety behaviors such as the use of carbon monoxide alarms, smoke alarms, child safety seats, and booster seats to prevent and/or reduce the consequences of childhood injuries. She also studies injuries associated with consumer products and sports and activity-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments.  Dr. McKenzie has published her findings in dozens of articles for major academic journals, including Pediatrics, Clinical Pediatrics, and the New England Journal of Medicine.

A national professional organization, SAVIR promotes the science of injury and violence prevention and care through the collective educational and scholarly activities of its members.  Working with practitioners and policymakers, SAVIR provides expertise and improved methodologies in the development, implementation, and assessment of injury prevention initiatives.  Its members also support the next generation of injury prevention professionals by advocating for funding, educational opportunities, and partnerships with researchers in developing countries.

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2012 Announcements


Dr. Gary Smith: A Health Care Hero

Friday, July 13, 2012 Gary A. Smith, MD, DrPH, founder and director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy, was named a Health Care Hero by Columbus Business First.   [more...]

He was awarded this prestigious title for having a positive impact in the field of injury prevention through his research and advocacy efforts.

Learn more about the award

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Ross County Farm Safety Day Camp

The Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Ross County Kids Injury Prevention Coalition are inviting children between the ages of 5 and 12 to the Ross County Farm Safety Day Camp on Tuesday, July 31.   [more...]

This free event will take place from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm at the Hirsch Fruit Farm in Chillicothe, Ohio. Participating children will enjoy fun, interactive safety stations, and great door prizes. Parents, grandparents and siblings are welcome to join. Children attending the event will also have the opportunity to receive a free T-shirt, while supplies last; be sure to register today at http://tiny.cc/safetyday to make sure that your child receives one!

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New Study Examines Hand Injures Presenting to U.S. EDs

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 According to a new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy, over 16 million children younger than 18 years were treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 through 2009 for hand-related injuries. This equates to an average of 818,688 injuries being treated every year, or a child being treated every 38 seconds.   [more...]

The study found that across all age groups, pediatric hand injuries most commonly occurred at home and that the most frequently involved products or objects were doors/windows (21 percent) and knives/blades (16 percent). Children younger than 5 years were almost twice as likely to be injured in the home as older children and were more likely to be injured by doors and windows.

Read the PubMed abstract
 

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Disability, Home Physical Environment and Non-Fatal Injuries among Young Children in China

Friday, May 18, 2012 A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy, Tongji Medical College and Wuhan University, compared the patterns of medically attended injuries between children with and without disabilities and explored the residential environment risks in five counties of Hubei Province in the People’s Republic of China.   [more...]

CIRP Renovates Strawser Park Playground

Thursday, May 17, 2012 As part of the SPARK (Safe Play Areas for Ross County Kids) Program, the Center for Injury Research and Policy helped renovate Strawser Park located in Chillicothe, Ohio.   [more...]

The new playground equipment now meets the 2008 revisions to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standards for public playgrounds and is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, which ensures that even children who are differently abled can enjoy a safe play environment at Strawser Park.

View the event video

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CDC Announces the U.S. National Action Plan for Child Injury Prevention

Monday, April 16, 2012 - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced the release of the U.S. National Action Plan for Child Injury Prevention today to help guide a national effort for preventing unintentional childhood injuries.   [more...]

The Center for Injury Research and Policy is proud to have contributed to the development of this plan and is looking forward to collaborating with researchers and child injury prevention experts across thenation to help reduce the impact of unintentional childhood injury in the U.S.

Print/download the National Action Plan for Child Injury Prevention

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CIRP Releases Informational Video on Youth Baseball Safety

Thursday, April 12, 2012 - Young children all across the United States have already started stepping onto baseball diamonds to play one of the nation’s favorite pastimes. Playing baseball is a great way for children to have fun and stay active. However, it is important to keep in mind that injuries can and do occur in this sport. In fact, every day during the youth baseball season, close to 850 children younger than 18 years of age are treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments for baseball-related injuries. An informational video recently released by CIRP shares guidelines and recommendations to help reduce the occurrences of these injuries.   [more...]

View the Youth Baseball Safety Informational Video by CIRP

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New Study Examines Pediatric Eye Injuries

Monday, April 2, 2012 A new study by researchers at CIRP examined activity- and consumer product-related eye injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments among children younger than 18 years of age.   [more...]

The study analyzed data from 1990 through 2009 and found that an average of 70, 310 injuries occurred each year during this period. The majority (69 percent) occurred at home and were caused by chemicals (17 percent) or sports and recreation (24 percent).

Read the PubMed abstract
 

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New Study Analyzes Elder Mistreatment in Rural China

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 Current knowledge about elder mistreatment is mainly derived from studies done in Western countries. As a result, very little is known about prevalence and risk factors for elder mistreatment elsewhere, including China. While people believe that elder mistreatment is not common in China because of strong family ties in that culture, a new study conducted by researcher at the Center for Injury Research and Policy has found elder mistreatment to be very common in rural China.   [more...]

Factors including depression, being widowed / divorced / single / separated, having physical disability, having a labor-intensive job, depending on self-made income, and living alone were all associated with increased risk of elder mistreatment.


Read the PubMed Abstract

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Internationally-Recognized Expert on Stairway Safety Endorses CIRP Research

Monday, March 19, 2012 - Jake Pauls, CPE said, "The NBC Today Show piece marks a turning point in consumer knowledge of home stair safety, bringing consumer knowledge of key stairway safety problems ahead of the knowledge held by many professionals in the building codes field for example.   [more...]

Today will, for some time, be an important day in the story about home stairway safety, and I express my great appreciation to Dr. Gary Smith and the people he worked with in recent weeks at NBC Television to make it happen."

Learn more about this study

Print/download residential stair building checklist

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Researchers Examine Postconcussive Symptoms Among Children with Mild TBI

Monday, March 05, 2012 - Dr. Keith Yeates and his team of researchers examined reliable change in postconcussive symptoms and its functional consequences among eight- to 15-year-old children with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) as compared with children with orthopedic injuries.   [more...]

Keith YeatesStudy results show that children with mild TBI were significantly more likely than those with orthopedic injuries to show reliable increases in both cognitive and somatic symptoms. These symptoms are associated with significant impairment in their daily lives, including decline in health-related quality of life and an increased likelihood of educational intervention.

Read the PubMed abstract.

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CIRP's Director to Participate in CPSC's First Twitter Chat

Tuesday, February 14, 2012 - Dr. Gary A. Smith (@GaryASmithMD), founder and director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital (@NationwideKids) and President of the Child Injury Prevention Alliance (@CIPAinjury), will participate as an injury prevention expert in a Twitter chat about TV tip-overs.   [more...]

Gary SmithAlong with the Consumer Product Safety Commission (@OnSafety) and Kids in Danger Executive Director, Nancy Cowles (@KidsinDanger), Dr. Smith will engage in a conversation about television safety in the home on Thursday, February 16th at 7 p.m. ET. To participate or view the discussion, use the hashtag #TVSafety.

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CIRP Affiliate Faculty Member to Participate in Women's Summit on Dating in the Digital Age

Friday, February 10, 2012 - CIRP affiliate faculty member and The Ohio State University Sexuality Studies Associate Professor, Dr. Amy Bonomi, will help participants of the Women’s Summit on Dating in the Digital Age discover how their use of technology relates to their individual intimacy style.   [more...]

Amy BonomiThe summit, being held at The Ohio State University on Friday, February 17, 2012 from 10 am to 3 pm, will help participants learn how the digital age affects their views and actions on dating and hooking up, how they can navigate through positive and difficult dating situations and how to better utilize technology to have healthy relationships.

Learn more about the event

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New National Study Examines Balcony Fall-Related Injuries

Wednesday, February 01, 2012 - A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy found that an estimated 5,088 fall-related injuries among children and adults were treated in U.S. emergency departments each year from 1990 to 2006 as a result of falls from balconies, decks, patios, porches, terraces, or verandas.   [more...]

According to the study published in the February 2011 issue of The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, most injuries were sustained by males (70 percent) and adults (63 percent), 94 percent occurred at home, and 48 percent of the injury events occurred during May through August.

While prohibiting children from playing on balconies and keeping balcony doors locked can help prevent these injuries, researchers also called for the establishment of stricter laws and building codes that would make climbing on balcony barriers more difficult for young children.

Read the PubMed Abstract

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Study Details the Effects of Computerized Neurocognitive Testing for Concussions

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - A new study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and Children’s Hospital Boston examined how concussions are being assessed among US high school athletes. The study found that only 40 percent of US high schools use computerized neurocognitive testing to assess sports-related concussions. Researchers, however, were optimistic since the use of computerized neurocognitive testing has increased from 26 percent in the 2008-2009 school year to 41 percent during the 2009-2010 academic year.   [more...]

New Study Examines Injuries Associated With Trimming And Pruning

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - A new study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy examined trimming- and pruning-related injuries that were treated in U.S. emergency departments from 1990 through 2007.   [more...]

Over the 18-year study period, researchers found a 64 percent increase in the annual number of injuries, which rose from 28,300 in 1990 to 46,300 in 2007. The fact that virtually all injuries (98 percent) occurred at home suggests that homeowners are not getting instruction about safe trimming practices and are unaware of the potential risks.

Read the PubMed abstract

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Dr. Marras Speaks about the Mine Safety Study

Monday, January 16, 2012 - Dr. William Marras, an affiliate faculty member at CIRP and Director of the Biodynamics Laboratory at The Ohio State University, spoke about the mine safety study commissioned by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health at the public meeting recently held in Pennsylvania. The study, subtitled “The Essential Components of Self Escape,” is being conducted by the National Academy of Sciences to identify key components of self-escape that aide mineworkers during a disaster.   [more...]

William MarrasA committee has been formed to research and write the recommendations based on the study’s findings. As the committee’s chair, Dr. Marras stressed the importance of the committee’s report and how closely it will be reviewed. His fellow committee members include an expert in fatigue management, a psychologist from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, experts in mine safety and training, and a former coal miner who currently works for the United Mine Workers of America.

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Dr. Gary Smith Receives the 2011 CPSC Chairman's Commendation Circle Award

Dr. Gary Smith, founder, director and principal investigator of the Center for Injury Research and Policy, was presented with the 2011 Chairman’s Commendation Circle Award by the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission for his significant contributions towards reducing deaths, preventing injuries, and improving consumer product safety.   [more...]

Print/download the complete press release

Print/download the complete CPSC press release

Read coverage of the award in the Columbus Dispatch

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2011 Announcements


New Study Analyzes Road Traffic Injuries in China

Monday, December 12, 2011 - A recent study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy analyzed the trends in injuries and fatalities from road traffic crashes from 1951 to 2008 in China. They compared the frequency, severity, and patterns of crashes by provinces, types of road, and injured road users.   [more...]

According to the study, over the past 5 decades, road traffic injuries in China increased substantially. From 1951 to 2008, the total number of road traffic crashes increased by 43-fold, nonfatal injuries increased by 50-fold, and fatalities increased by 85-fold. Considering the burgeoning public health problem r oad traffic injuries have become in China, researchers recommend developing and implementing programs that target efforts to prevent nonfatal injuries and fatalities caused by road traffic crashes in this emerging country.  

Read the PubMed abstract

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Dr. Dawn Comstock Recieves Recognition at the Youth Sports Safety Summit

Thursday, December 08, 2011 - On December 6, 2011, Dr. Dawn Comstock, principal investigator at CIRP, was recognized at the Youth Sports Safety Alliance’s summit for her contributions to education, research and legislation in the field of youth sports and injury surveillance.   [more...]

Dr. Comstock receiving awardAs a result of her continued efforts, Dr. Comstock is considered one of the country’s leading experts on the topic, and her studies have had wide-reaching impact and attention across the national landscape.

Print/download the complete press release.

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Researchers Analyze New vs. Recurrent Sports Concussions

Monday, December 5, 2012 A new study by researchers at CIRP compared new versus recurrent sports-related concussions among high school athletes participating in nine sports from 2005 to 2010 in the U.S. Study results show that athletes sustaining recurrent concussions had longer symptom resolution times, were kept out of play longer and reported being unconscious more frequently than athletes sustaining new concussions.   [more...]

Among the nine sports that were studied, those with the highest rates of recurrent concussions included football, girls’ soccer, girls’ basketball and wrestling; the rates of recurrent concussion were higher during competition than practice.

Read the PubMed abstract
 

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Researchers Examine Firework-Related Injuries in the Capital of Iran

Friday, December 2, 2012 A new collaborative study by researchers at CIRP and Tehran University of Medical Sciences examined firework-related injuries during the Last Wednesday Eve Festival in Tehran, Iran. The study focused on the association of socioeconomic status and educational level with the use of fireworks and the incidence of firework-related injury.   [more...]

The study found a direct association between higher educational level of the head of the household and participation in firework-related activities by household members, expenditure on fireworks, and the amount of financial loss due to fireworks. Findings from the study will help inform future efforts to reduce the incidence and severity of firework-related injuries during the Last Wednesday Eve Festival.

Read the PubMed abstract
 

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International Affiliated Faculty Prof. Wang Zengzhen Visits CIRP

Friday, December 02, 2011 - On Nov. 28, 2011, Professor Zengzhen Wang and Ms. Meirong Hu, invited by Dr. Huiyun Xiang, visited the Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP).   [more...]

Prof. Wang VisitProf. Wang and Ms. Hu came from Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, in China. Prof. Wang was the Chinese collaborator in the NIH/Fogarty International Center program---USA-China Agricultural Injury Research Training Project, and Ms. Hu was the program manager. The project is a 5-year training program (from 2007 to 2011) that has provided injury research training to more than 130 researchers in China.

As part of their visit, Prof. Wang and Ms. Hu exchanged ideas with researchers at CIRP and The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s about program management and IRB working procedures. Their visit helped reinforce the bonds that have already been established through the International Program at CIRP.

Read the complete press release in Chinese

Read the complete press release in English

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New Study Examines Sprains and Strains Among U.S. Cheerleaders

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - A new national study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found that nearly a quarter (24 percent) of all cheerleading-related sprains and strains that were treated were recurrent injuries.   [more...]

 According to researchers, the greatest risk for strains and sprains is a history of past injury; therefore, injury prevention efforts should emphasize prevention of the first injury and address return-to-play decisions for both new and recurrent injuries.

Read the PubMed abstract.

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Assessing and Managing Sports-Related Concussions

Monday, November 14, 2011 - A new study by researchers at CIRP and Children’s Hospital Boston found that a lack of standardized evidence-based guidelines has led to inconsistencies in who is diagnosing and managing concussions sustained by athletes at high school sporting events in the U.S.   [more...]

Additional highlights of the research include:

  •  While a majority of concussed athletes were examined by a medical professional, the type of professional varied -- from athletic trainer, to primary care doctor, to specialist, to a combination of these three.

    • Athletic trainers were just as effective as specialists in assessing and managing concussions.

    • It is important for primary care doctors to stay up-to-date on current concussion management guidelines as many high school athletes only see primary care doctors and not specialists.

  • Clinicians in the study ordered CT scans 6.5 times more often than MRIs, highlighting the need for additional education to help medical professionals recognize the benefits of using MRIs over CT scans in this scenario.

    • As opposed to CT scans, MRIs have no radiation and are more effective in detecting traumatic lesions.

  • Non-medical professionals are still making return-to-play decisions for some high school athletes. Researchers strongly recommend that only physicians or athletic trainers make this decision given the serious risks that go along with putting athletes back in play before their symptoms have resolved.

Print/download the complete press release

Print/download the return to play after concussions fact sheet

Read the PubMed abstract

Learn more about concussions or schedule an appointment at a concussion clinic

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SPARK Project Sponsors 'Family Safety Day'

Monday, November 14, 2011 - Residents of Ross and Pickaway counties are invited to attend the Family Safety Day, a free event hosted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy’s SPARK Project at the Pickaway Ross Career and Technology Center (895 Crouse Chapel Rd. in Chillicothe) on Saturday, November 19, 2011, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.   [more...]

This fun-filled event is designed to educate families about injury prevention through hands-on learning opportunities and activities for kids.

Print/download the complete press release

Print/download the event flyer

Learn more about the SPARK Project

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Dr. Wilkinson to Participate in a Panel Discussion for a New Documentary Film on Youth Violence

Monday, November 07, 2011 - Dr. Deanna L. Wilkinson, an affiliate faculty member at the Center for Injury Research and Policy, an associate professor at The Ohio State University, and founder of the Youth Violence Prevention Advisory Board, will serve as a panelist for a discussion on youth violence in Columbus following the local premiere of the award-winning documentary film The Interrupters.   [more...]

The film, which tells the story of three former gang members who are actively trying to prevent violence in their hometown of Chicago, is scheduled to be shown at the Wexner Center for the Arts’ Mershon Auditorium on The Ohio State University campus in Columbus, Ohio, at 7:00pm on November 9, 2011. Other panelists participating in the post-screening discussion include Eddie Bocanegra and Ameena Matthews, violence interrupters from Chicago, and Zak Piper, co-producer of The Interrupters.

 

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Sarah Krygowski Receives Outstanding Health Educator Award

Thursday, October 20, 2011 - On October 20, 2011, the Ohio Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) presented Sarah Krygowski, Project Coordinator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy with the 2011 Outstanding Health Educator award, for her achievements and efforts in injury prevention education.   [more...]

Sarah KrygowskiThe conference, held at Mohican State Park Lodge and Conference Center, was presented by Ohio SOPHE and the State Office of Rural Health at the Ohio Department of Health.

Sarah is currently the Project Coordinator for the Safe Play Areas for Ross County Kids (SPARK) Project, a study focusing on decreasing the risk of injury to kids while playing on playgrounds and on farms. She is a Certified Health Education Specialist, Child Passenger Safety Technician, and a Playground Safety Inspector. In addition, Sarah serves on the board of both the Ohio SOPHE and the Ohio State University College of Public Health Alumni Society.  

Learn more about Ohio SOPHE

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Dr. Gary Smith Receives the 2011 AAP Outstanding Achievement Award

Monday, October 17, 2011 - On October 17, 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) presented Dr. Gary A. Smith, director and principal investigator of the Center for Injury Research and Policy with the 2011 Outstanding Achievement Award.   [more...]

Gary SmithThe award, sponsored by the Council on Community Pediatrics and the Section on Epidemiology, recognized Dr. Smith for his outstanding contributions toward advocating for children and child health in the community through the effective use of epidemiologic information.

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New Study Sheds Light on Why Domestic Violence Victims Drop Charges

Friday, October 07, 2011 - A new study, led by CIRP affiliate faculty member Amy Bonomi, analyzed live telephone conversations between domestic violence perpetrators and victims to find out how and why victims decide to refuse prosecution.   [more...]

Amy BonomiQualitative data from 25 couples was collected from October 2008 to June 2011. In all cases, the male perpetrator in the relationship was being held in a detention facility in the U.S. for domestic violence charges. His telephone calls to the female victim during the pre-prosecution period were recorded in real time and then analyzed.

Study results show that the victim’s decision to recant was influenced by the perpetrator’s minimizations of the abuse, his appeals to her sympathy through descriptions of his suffering in jail and life without her. It was further found that once the victim arrived at her decision to recant, the couple constructed the recantation plan by: redefining the abuse event to protect the perpetrator, blaming the State for the couple’s separation, and exchanging specific instructions on the next course of action.

With as many as 25 percent of women across the U.S. experiencing domestic violence in their lifetime, and 80 percent of the victims recanting once they have filed charges, finding out how and why they change their mind is an important piece of the victim tampering puzzle in domestic violence cases.

Read the PubMed abstract.

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Dr. Smith Receives National Recognition

Friday, October 07, 2011 - Dr. Gary A. Smith, founder, director, and principal investigator of CIRP, received an honorable mention for the 2011 Physician Advocacy Merit Award presented by the Institute of Medicine as a Profession (IMAP).   [more...]

Gary SmithThe award gives national recognition to physicians for their commitments and accomplishments in the advocacy arena. Dr. Smith received this award in recognition of his active research and advocacy efforts in the field of injury prevention.
 
Learn more about IMAP and the award.

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Researchers Call for Preventative Interventions to Reduce the Occurence of Injuries Requiring Surgery Among High School Athletes

Saturday, October 01, 2011 - A new study by researchers at CIRP utilized data collected as part of the High School RIO™ project to examine athletic injuries among high school athletes that required surgery.   [more...]

In the nine sports studied, there was an estimated average of 73,056 injuries requiring surgery each year. Boys’ football and boys’ wrestling had the highest rates of injury requiring surgery followed by girls’ soccer and girls’ basketball. The knee was the most commonly injured body site followed by the head/face/mouth and shoulder.

Researchers recommend implementing sports-specific, evidence-based preventive interventions to help reduce the rates of these injuries.

Read the PubMed Abstract

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Dr. Smith Elected President of Midwest Injury Prevention Alliance

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - Dr. Gary A. Smith, director and principal investigator of the Center for Injury Research and Policy, was recently elected President by his peers on the Board of Directors of the Midwest Injury Prevention.   [more...]

Gary SmithDr. Smith’s tenure will begin immediately and span through December 31, 2012. In his role as President, Dr. Smith will be responsible for coordinating and facilitating various MIPA meetings, correspondence and activities, as well as functioning as the designated spokesperson for MIPA.

Learn more about MIPA.

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CIRP Participates in Wear Your Bike Helmet to Work or School Day

Thursday, September 22, 2011 - On September 21, 2011, the Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics launched the Put a Lid on It! Bike Helmet Safety Awareness campaign by holding the first "Wear Your Bike Helmet to Work or School Day” in the state of Ohio. Both the event and the campaign were designed to increase bicycle helmet use in Ohio by increasing awareness and encouraging both adults and children to wear their helmets every time they ride a bicycle.   [more...]

Employees from the Center for Injury Research and Policy took part by not only wearing their helmets to work on September 21st but also by producing a video to show how employees throughout Nationwide Children's proudly supported the Put a Lid on It! campaign by participating in "Wear Your Bike Helmet to Work or School Day."

Print/download the Ohio AAP's complete press release


View the Wear Your Helmet to Work Day 2011 at Nationwide Children's video.

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Dr. Gary Smith Featured in New Book

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - Dr. Gary A. Smith, director and principal investigator of the Center for Injury Research and Policy, is featured in Amy Showalter’s book The Under Dog: How Ordinary People Change the Minds of the Powerful Edge and Live to Tell About It.   [more...]

In the section titled “One Vivid Example vs. Six Years of Statistics,” Dr. Smith shares his experiences as a resident, a doctor and a researcher. Through his anecdotes, he demonstrates the importance of Translational Research and illustrates the impact that it can have on the community and the decisions of “powerful” policy makers.  

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Dr. Smith Named Member of Ohio Smoke Alarm Advisory Task Force

Friday, July 22, 2011 - On July 22, 2011, Ohio’s Fire Marshal, Larry Flowers, announced the creation of the Division of State Fire Marshal’s Smoke Alarm Advisory Task Force. Dr. Gary A. Smith, the Director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy, was named one of the key members of this new task force.   [more...]


The Smoke Alarm Advisory Task Force was created to address the fact that 90% of the home fires in Ohio that have fatalities or injuries occur in homes without working smoke alarms. The task force will examine relevant research and current recommendations regarding the use and placement of photoelectric and ionization smoke alarms in residential properties and develop guidelines for best practices to reduce the number of fire-related injuries and deaths in our state.

“The members of the task force were specifically selected for their experience in analyzing and evaluating technical information,” said State Fire Marshal Flowers. “Their interest in the issue of home, fire and public safety, along with their high integrity and widely accepted credibility, will provide us with a recommendation of smoke alarm protection for Ohio’s homes.”

View news article on task force formation

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Middle School Football Coaches Needed for New Study on Football Injuries

Wednesday, July 13, 2011 - Researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, and The Ohio State University’s College of Medicine and Public Health are currently conducting the 2011-2012 Middle School RIO™ Study, an internet-based surveillance study of injuries sustained by middle school aged football players.   [more...]

By participating in this project, you can help researchers learn more about the ways middle school football players are injured so that researchers can study how to better protect them. Every participant will be compensated for their participation.

This research project uses RIO™ (Reporting Information Online), an internet-based surveillance system, to collect data from a national sample of middle school and Pop Warner football participants to identify rates, patterns of injury, risk, and protective factors for sports injuries at the middle school level. The surveillance system being used in this study was modeled after the successful National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System and High School RIO™, systems that consistently produce high quality data on sports-related injuries, exposures, and risk factors among collegiate and high school athletes.

If you and your school/team would like to participate in the 2011-2012 Middle School RIO™ Study or if you simply want additional information about this important project, please click on the link below.

View media coverage of RIO™ research

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Dr. Comstock and RIS Win 2011 Nonprofit Creativity Award for RIO™

Thursday, June 30, 2011 - The GroundWork group recently named their 2011 nonprofit creativity award winners. These honors go to Ohio nonprofits who have utilized information technology creatively in any of eleven different categories: strategic planning, marketing, constituent management, communications, fundraising, service delivery, reporting, day-to-day operations, training and education, technology maturity, and the social enterprise innovative program.   [more...]

Dr. Comstock’s innovative use of RIO™, the internet-based data collection tool created for her by Research Information Services (RIS) of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s, for sports injury surveillance research was nominated in three categories. High School RIO™ won the award for the Reporting category (the nonprofit that meets reporting requirements and conducts organizational, financial and management, outcome measurement and board reporting with advance tools). Additionally, High School RIO™ was a semifinalist in the Training & Education (the nonprofit that has enacted a technology training and education plan for staff that includes documentation of skills and matches skills to job requirements) and Technology Maturity (the nonprofit that demonstrates overall technology maturity when looking at all of the business functions together) categories.

Over the past 6 years Dr. Comstock has utilized RIO™ in four different large national surveillance studies. To date, these research projects have resulted in 41 peer-review manuscripts.

This success is the direct result of the early support provided by RIS. Under Mary France’s guidance, Jason Morrison, wrote the code for this unique internet-based surveillance tool. Additionally, RIS provided hosting and support services for the first several years of the High School RIO™ project.

Learn more about RIO™

Learn more about the GroundWork group

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New Crib Safety Videos Give Tips to Parents and Caregivers on Creating a Safe Sleeping Environment

Tuesday, June 28, 2011 - Starting June 28, 2011, all cribs that are manufactured and sold (including resale) in the United States must comply with the Consumer Product and Safety Commission’s new federal standards. In addition to requiring rigorous testing and improving the quality of the crib parts and hardware, the new rules also prohibit the manufacture or sale of the traditional drop-side rail cribs. The new safety standards apply to manufacturers, retail stores, Internet retailers, resale shops, auction sites and consumers.   [more...]

The new standards also apply to cribs currently being used in places of public accommodation such as child care centers and hotels. These facilities have until December 28, 2012, to make the shift to cribs that are compliant with the new federal safety standards. The details of the new standards and answers to frequently asked questions are available on the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s website.

Print/download the details of the new safety standards

Print/download the frequently asked questions about the new safety standards

With these new standards taking effect, the Center for Injury Research and Policy has created a two-part Crib Safety Informational Video to help parents and caregivers select the right crib and create a safe sleeping environment for their little ones.

View the Crib Safety Videos



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Dr. Amy Bonomi Recieves 2011 Award of Distinction

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - On May 31 2011, Dr. Amy Bonomi, affiliated faculty member of the Center for Injury Research and Policy and associate professor of human development and family science at The Ohio State University, received the College of Education and Human Ecology Award of Distinction for 2011 from The Ohio State University.   [more...]

Amy BonomiDr. Bonomi was selected for this award for her distinguished and prolific scholarship.  Not only has she written 57 peer-reviewed articles but she makes it a priority to share the findings from her research by educating other investigators, teachers, policy makers, advocates and the public in general.

Dr. Bonomi’s research focuses on the long-term consequences of teen dating violence and the intimacy dynamics within couples that keep violent relationships intact.

Learn More

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New Study Finds Back Pain Among Chinese Farmers Affects Quantity and Quality of Work

Saturday, May 14, 2011 - A new study published in Spine by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy investigated the prevalence of back pain among farmers in the Heilongjiang Province of the People's Republic of China and examined the associations between potential risk factors and back pain among these farmers.   [more...]

The study included data collected in 2008 from 2,045 farmers ages 15 years and older, and analyzed the prevalence of self-reported back pain during the previous three months. Results from the study showed that 38 percent of farmers reported back pain, and two out of three of these farmers indicated that the pain affected the quantity and quality of their work. Female farmers, farmers who experienced stress regularly and older farmers were more likely to report back pain.

Researchers recommend further research to investigate back pain among China’s agricultural workforce and address this important public health issue.

Read the PubMed abstract.

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New National Study Examines Bowling-Related Injuries

Monday, May 02, 2011 - A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy examined bowling-related injuries from 1990 to 2008. During the 19-year study period, an estimated 375,468 injuries were treated in U.S. emergency departments for an average of approximately 19,800 injuries each year. Most common diagnoses were sprains/strains and soft tissue injuries while the most commonly injured body parts were fingers, the trunk and the ankle/foot/toe region. Falling, slipping and tripping were the most common mechanisms of injury.   [more...]

To prevent bowling-related injuries:

  • Warm-up prior to bowling to prevent muscle strains

  • When getting your bowling ball from the ball return, put your hands on the side of the ball instead of the front or back so your fingers don’t get smashed by an approaching ball.

  • Wear bowling shoes with soles that are slick enough to allow sliding across the lane

  • Wipe the lanes clean to clear any moisture that could cause shoes to stick

  • Wear wrist/arm/finger supports if needed

  • Make sure that children use bowling balls that are the appropriate size and weight for them

    • Children should bowl using a ball that is approximately 10 percent of their own body weight

    • Children who are avid bowlers should be fitted for a new ball every 6 months to ensure that the fit of the ball is adjusted to reflect their growth

Read the PubMed abstract

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OSU Medical Student Receives Commendation

Monday, April 18, 2011 - Kate Pollard, a second year medical student at the Ohio State University, received an award for her exceptional poster presentation during the 10th Annual Ohio State University Medical Center Trainee Research Day on April 7, 2011.   [more...]

The poster, which received accolades from The Ohio State University Medical Center’s faculty judges, was based on Pollard’s research on volleyball-related injuries that she conducted as part of the Medical Student Injury Training Program at the Center for Injury Research and Policy. The research resulted in a paper co-authored with center director Dr. Gary A. Smith and will be published in a future issue of Clinical Pediatrics.

Learn more about the 10th Annual Ohio State University Medical Center Trainee Research Day

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RIO™ Data Used in High School Field Hockey Policy Change

Saturday, April 16, 2011 - Each year in the U.S., over 64,000 student-athletes participate in high school field hockey, and these athletes are at risk of severe eye injury from contact with the stick and/or ball. While protective eyewear for field hockey players is readily available, its use has not been mandatory. However, after considering data from Dr. Dawn Comstock’s High School RIO™ surveillance system, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) announced a new national safety policy on April 15, 2011.   [more...]

Beginning in the 2011-2012 school year, all high school students participating in field hockey in the U.S. will be required to use protective eyewear. This is a great example of how research can be translated into real world action to prevent injury.

Learn more about the NFHS protective eyewear mandate

Learn more about High School RIO™

View media coverage of RIO research

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Dr. Comstock Receives Recognition from SAVIR

Friday, April 08, 2011 - Dr. Dawn Comstock received an award for Extraordinary Service to the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR) Board of Directors during her tenure on the board from 2007 to 2010. She was also recognized for her efforts in establishing the SAVIR student abstract award.   [more...]

Dawn ComstockThe award for Extraordinary Service was presented to Dr. Comstock at the 2011 Joint Annual Meeting of the Safe States Alliance, SAVIR, and the CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control in Iowa City, IA, on April 8, 2011.

Learn more about SAVIR

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New National Study Examines Dislocation/ Separation Injuries among U.S. High School Athletes

Monday, March 07, 2011 - Researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy examined dislocation/separation injuries among U.S. high school athletes participating in football, soccer, volleyball, basketball, wrestling, baseball and softball. Even though dislocation/separation injuries only make up 4% of all injuries, they can be extremely severe. Study results show that in 32% of cases, athletes did not return to play within 3 weeks of injury, and in 12% of cases, injuries were severe enough to require surgery.   [more...]

Researchers urge coaches to learn and be able to recognize the symptoms of a dislocation/separation so that they can give athletes the appropriate treatment and reduce the risk of recurring injuries. Researchers also recommend educating athletes and referees to minimize illegal/dangerous player-to-player contact since contact with another player was the most common mechanism of injury.

In 18% of cases, the injuries were recurring, and recurrent injuries were most often sustained when playing volleyball, basketball and baseball. The most commonly injured body sites were the shoulder (55%), wrist/hand (17%) and knee (16%). Sport-specific training and conditioning to strengthen these high-risk body regions is one way to physically prepare the athletes and help prevent these injuries.

Read the PubMed abstract

View media coverage of RIOTM research

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Krista Wheeler Receives the 2010 Outstanding Technical Staff Award

Thursday, February 03, 2011 - In January 2011, Krista Wheeler, a Research Associate with Dr. Huiyun Xiang’s Research Team at the Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP), was presented with the 2010 Outstanding Technical Staff Award by The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.   [more...]

Krista WheelerKrista was recognized for her commitment to advancing outstanding research, for her integrity and for her support of visiting international scholars at CIRP. In addition to managing projects for Dr. Xiang's team and supporting the international visiting scholars program, Krista was a co-author of 5 peer-reviewed papers which were published or accepted for publication in 2010. She also played an integral role in coordinating and submitting the just-in-time grant materials for a recently awarded RO1 research project while the principal investigator, Dr. Huiyun Xiang, was out of the country, running a research training workshop in the People’s Republic of China.

Krista’s fellow team members, CIRP’s staff and visiting international scholars all value her hard work, integrity and dedication.  “Krista is a valuable member of my research team. In the past 4 years, she has played a crucial rule in the success of my research projects. It is a pleasure working with her,” praised Dr. Huiyun Xiang.

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Dr. Huiyun Xiang Receives Outstanding Principal Investigator and Mentor Awards

Thursday, February 03, 2011 - In January 2011, Dr. Huiyun Xiang received two awards from The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. In recognition of his achievements as both a Principal Investigator and the Director of the International Program at the Center for Injury Research and Policy, Dr. Xiang was awarded both the 2010 Outstanding Principal Investigator and the 2010 Outstanding Mentor awards.   [more...]

Huiyun XiangIn 2010, while working on 2 federally-funded projects and 5 grants, Dr. Xiang was awarded an R01 project by the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety. He was also selected to participate as a national expert in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthy People 2020 Initiative’s Disability and Health Workgroup. Dr. Xiang and his co-authors had 15 peer-reviewed publications and gave 7 presentations at national and international conferences this year.

Dr. Xiang also served as a member of the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety’s extramural grant Scientific Review Group, the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Intramural Grant Review Committee, the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research’s scientific conference committee, the Injury Prevention’s editorial board, and served as the deputy section editor of BMC Public Health. As a mentor, Dr. Xiang worked with Fogarty Scholar Awardees and hosted international scholars and students.  He had five mentee publications and the USA-China Agricultural Injury Research Training Workshop trained 25 researchers in Xi’an, China in 2010. “We are thrilled that Dr. Xiang was recognized as an Outstanding PI and an Outstanding Mentor. We are incredibly proud of his achievements and want to congratulate him on receiving these honors,” said Dr. Gary A. Smith, Director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy.

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New National Study Examines Injury Patterns by BMI

Tuesday, February 01, 2011 - A new study published by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy examined injury patterns by body mass index (BMI) among a nationally representative sample of U.S. high school athletes across several sports. Data from the study show that over one-third of all injured high school athletes were overweight or obese and that injury patterns among all athletes differed based on their body mass indices.   [more...]

According to the study, which analyzed data from the RIO™ study obtained during the 2005-2008 school years, 13,881 total injuries among high school athletes were reported. The most commonly injured body regions were the ankle/foot (23%), knee (15%), and the head/face/neck (15%). Across all sports, obese athletes sustained a higher proportion of knee injuries compared to athletes of normal weight. The most common injury diagnoses were incomplete ligament sprains (28.2%) and incomplete muscle strains (14.0%). Fractures, which accounted for almost 10% of injuries, were mostly sustained by underweight athletes, and half of all injuries were sustained following contact with another person.

Study results show that football, wrestling and girls’ soccer were the sports with the highest rate of injury, and injured athletes involved in football, wrestling, boys’ basketball and baseball were more likely to be overweight or obese than athletes injured in other sports. Researchers recommend that coaches and certified athletic trainers emphasize the importance of healthy eating habits and screen all underweight athletes, particularly females, to determine whether any disordered eating habits may exist. They should also focus on preventing knee and ankle injuries among obese athletes by improving their balance, flexibility, and strength. In addition, since contact with another player was the most common mechanism of injury, coaches and certified athletic trainers must be sure that their athletes are physically capable of withstanding the usual physical contact without an excess risk of injury before they are allowed to compete.

Read the PubMed abstract.

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CIRP Staff Members Present SAVIR Webinar

Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - On January 20, 2011, the Center for Injury Research and Policy’s staff members Dr. Dawn Comstock, Dr. Lara McKenzie, Tracy Mehan and Kristi Roberts presented a webinar as part of a 2011 webinar series organized by the Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR) entitled “Talking to The New York Times: Why you should share your research with the media and how to get the media interested.”   [more...]

During the presentation, CIRP staff members discussed the significance of engaging with major media outlets such as The New York Times, CNN, ESPN and The Today Show, to share public health messages and to help advance the field of scientific research. Using examples from their own research, they also provided directions and recommendations for researchers on how to take their research from the published article to the media.

View, print, or download the pdf format of the presentation

Access the archived SAVIR Webinar

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Dr. Huiyun Xiang Serves as a Committee Member for the Healthy People 2020 Initiative

Friday, January 07, 2011 - In 2010, Dr. Huiyun Xiang served as an injury expert in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthy People 2020 Initiative for the Disability and Health Workgroup. As a member of the committee, he collaborated with other experts to propose a new Healthy People 2020 Objective (DH-19, Developmental) to reduce health disparities and address some of the health issues facing individuals with disabilities who have suffered nonfatal unintentional injuries.   [more...]

Huiyun XiangUpon review, the committee’s proposed objective has been accepted, and a new Healthy People 2020 Objective of reducing injuries among individuals with disabilities has officially been approved. The Center for Injury Research and Policy would like to congratulate Dr. Xiang on this achievement.

Read the DH-19 Objective.

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Recent Study Receives AAP Recognition

Thursday, January 06, 2011 - The Center for Injury Research and Policy congratulates Dr. Dawn Comstock on her highly-regarded study of concussion management among U.S. high school athletes. The recently-published collaborative study between Dr. Dawn Comstock of the Center for Injury Research and Policy and Dr. William Meehan III of the Sports Concussion Clinic at Children’s Hospital Boston was highlighted in the American Academy of Pediatrics’ monthly journal, AAP Grand Rounds’ January 2011 issue.   [more...]

Given that the topic of concussion management is under close scrutiny, Dr. Comstock’s unparalleled study has set high standards for fellow sports injury research scholars across the country.

Read the PubMed abstract

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New Study Finds Back Pain among Chinese Farmers Affects Quantity and Quality of Work

A new study published in Spine by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy investigated the prevalence of back pain among farmers in the Heilongjiang Province of the People's Republic of China and examined the associations between potential risk factors and back pain among these farmers.   [more...]

The study included data collected in 2008 from 2,045 farmers ages 15 years and older, and analyzed the prevalence of self-reported back pain during the previous three months. Results from the study showed that 38 percent of farmers reported back pain, and two out of three of these farmers indicated that the pain affected the quantity and quality of their work. Female farmers, farmers who experienced stress regularly and older farmers were more likely to report back pain.

Researchers recommend further research to investigate back pain among China’s agricultural workforce and address this important public health issue.

Read the PubMed abstract

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